Wed January 7, 2015

By Jacob Barron

Plastic pellets are the number one business expense for all processors and converters. In addition to saving money, pledging to zero pellet loss will strengthen your company’s reputation in the community, operational efficiency, contribution to water quality and wildlife, as well as any existing safety and sustainability programs.

Looking beyond the company, pellet loss has many negative impacts on the entire plastics industry as a whole. Consider this:

- Slips and falls are a major cause of industry accidents

- Accidents mean lost work time, higher workers’ compensation costs and lower employee morale

- Violations of stormwater regulations in states like California can result in civil penalties of up to $3,000 per incident (e.g., Cal. Code. Regs. title 23 § 13385). Any person discharging unauthorized waste in violation of CWC § 13264 could be found guilty of a misdemeanor and fined up to $1,000 per day in violation

-Spilled pellets can eventually end up in our waterways and the ocean. Whether they’re handled in an inland plant or a seaside facility, pellets can be transported to storm drains that lead to rivers and then to the ocean — resulting in litter and posing a threat to marine life such as sea birds, turtles and fish

When your employees and vendors handle resin pellets responsibly, pellets are kept out of the natural environment. The more resin material that stays in your product line rather than becoming waste, the more efficient your overall business operations will become. Additionally, your company enhances its reputation as a good steward of the environment, which is an increasingly important factor for attracting the investment community and high quality employees.

SPI’s ultimate goal is to help all plastics manufacturers, processors, converters and transporters keep plastic pellets out of the environment and improve the state of our industry for a better future.

FIVE STEPS TO ACHIEVING ZERO PELLET LOSS

1. Commit to making zero pellet loss a priority.

2. Assess your company’s situation and needs.

  • Comply with all environmental laws and regulations that address pellet containment
  • Conduct a site audit
  • Determine if you have appropriate facilities and equipment
  • Determine if employees have and are following appropriate procedures
  • Identify problem areas and develop new procedures to address them
  • Communicate your experiences to peers in the industry

3. Make necessary upgrades in facilities and equipment as appropriate.

4. Raise employee awareness and create accountability.

  • Establish written procedures (The procedures and checklists in this manual may be modified to suit your needs. They are available in the checklists section of the Operation Clean Sweep website).
  • Make certain the procedures are readily available to employees.
  • Conduct regular employee training and awareness campaigns on Operation Clean Sweep.
  • Assign employees the responsibility to monitor and manage pellet containment.
  • Encourage each worker to sign the employee commitment pledge.
  • Solicit employee feedback on your program.
  • Use workplace reminders such as stickers, posters, etc.

5. Follow up and enforce procedures – when management cares, employees will too.

  • Conduct routine inspections of the facility grounds – production areas and parking lots, drainage areas, driveways, etc.
  • Continuously look for ways to improve the program. Share best practices through the Operation Clean Sweep website

SPI and ACC have created a number of management checklists to assist all plastics processors in implementing OCS. The checklists are divided into two categories: Management and Employees. The checklists have been created so they can be downloaded and customized for your company. These enhancements will make it easy to create forms and materials that have the greatest value for your company.

Take the pledge today at  www.opcleansweep.org